STOP THE REVOLVING JAILHOUSE DOOR: An IPPS Executive Proposal to Reduce Recidivism

I.P.P.S. MENTORING PROGRAM INC.
Involved Parents Productive Students

PO Box 214 Delmar, DE 19940

IPPS MENTORING PROGRAM

EXECUTIVE PROPOSAL

RECIDIVISM

STOP THE REVOLVING JAILHOUSE DOOR

Robert J. Williams, President & Executive Director
I.P.P.S. Mentoring Program Inc.
PO Box 214
Delmar, DE 19940

Copyright@ 2013 I.P.P.S. Mentoring Program, Inc. All rights reserved

I.P.P.S. MENTORING PROGRAM

HISTORY

The I.P.P.S. Mentoring Program (Involved Parents Productive Students), is a community based mentoring program. The I.P.P.S. Mentoring Program is a nonprofit organization that was founded and created in October of 2005. The mentoring program was developed by a common belief that many youth and the incarcerated in the community lack meaningful academic and career guidance. Determined to make a difference, the President of I.P.P.S. convened a series of meetings with several community organizations on the Lower Eastern Shore of Maryland with the purpose of developing and implementing a mentoring program for at risk youth and the incarcerated. The I.P.P.S. Mentoring Program is a non-profit IRS 501 c 3 corporation. Since opening its doors, the I.P.P.S. Mentoring Program has forged strong partnerships with the local business community, media, the local school district, local churches, correctional facilities and other youth/incarcerated-serving organizations in the community.
The I.P.P.S. Mentoring Program was the proud recipient of the 2010, Excellence in Mentoring Award given by the Maryland Mentoring Partnership.

The President, in conjunction with a group of approximately nine (9) volunteer staff Directors will oversee the operations of the I.P.P.S. Mentoring Program. They will develop and operate a one-on-one mentoring program to help improve the knowledge and skills of involved youth and those incarcerated, in subjects such as Dave Ramsey’s Financial Peace University, Active Parenting, Anger Management, etc. The incarcerated will be trained in job skills, Active Parenting, Dave Ramsey’s Financial Peace University, Anger Management, etc. To provide them with job skills that will help towards obtaining meaningful employment upon their release from incarceration or soon after.

MISSION

TO DECREASE THE HIGH RATE of RECIDIVISM

VISION

TO PROVIDE THE NECESSARY TRAINING FOR SUITABLE EMPLOYMENT UPON RELEASE FROM INCARCERATION

GOALS

1. Ensure each inmate (mentee) in the program acquires the necessary education/job skills prior to their release
2. Reduce the high rate of recidivism currently being experienced in our communities
3. Provide the necessary housing, food, clothing, etc., needed until employment is obtained
4. Provide Active Parenting Training, Anger Management Training, Dave Ramsey’s Financial Peace University Training to allow inmates to be able to better transition back into society
5. Help connect inmate(s) with substance abuse needs to obtain proper care

STOP THE REVOLVING JAILHOUSE DOOR

We hear about high crime rates and how our prisons and jails are packed. Citizens scream for more police and politicians give lip service to increased protection. But many of us have no understanding of why our crime rates are so high, the majority of which are drug-related. The recidivism rate in Delaware within three (3) years after release from prison is nearly 71%, according to the Delaware Criminal Justice Council Statistical Analysis Center’s July 2013, 2008 and 2009, report. That means that almost 8 out of 10 released inmates return to prison within three (3) years of their release. The overwhelming majority of those released, are re-incarcerated for the same or similar crime.

As concerned citizens, we should be asking: “Why are our children, parents and siblings being arrested and incarcerated, over and over again?”

Why haven’t repeat offenders been able to break the cycle of criminal activity that has prevented them from living a crime – free life? Why do children have to grow up without a Dad or Mom because they are imprisoned?

The emphasis over the past several years had been to focus on the victim and punish the perpetrator. There are many programs that tend to the victim’s needs such as the Victim’s Compensation Program and the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board. These are wonderful programs that work to alleviate the pain and financial suffering of victims. But, in the end, they do nothing to address our initial question: Why do our children, parents and siblings continue through the revolving door of the criminal justice system?

I.P.P.S. is addressing that very question. Involved Parents Productive Students (I.P.P.S) has recently partnered with the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services seeking to pilot a one-on-one mentoring program for inmates. The mentoring program is currently in full operation at the Poplar Hill Pre-Release Unit located in Quantico, Maryland.

The underlying premise of the IPPS approach is that everyone started out with a dream. Some of us were able to achieve our dreams (or modified versions of it), while others were distracted along the way. Mentors work with their assigned mentees to help resuscitate those dreams and help them set goals for getting back on track. IPPS wants to help mentees recognize that not only are they responsible for themselves, but also for their children, who need role models in their lives, in order to end the revolving door dilemma.

Mentors come from all backgrounds and walks of life, because each of us has something to share, something that may change the perspective of a mentee, and help them on their way. IPPS also hopes to refer mentees to skills and job preparedness training as it grows and expands to other facilities on the Eastern Shore, the State of Maryland and around the region. The benefit of such a program to our communities cannot be overstated. Breaking the chain of recidivism is critical to lowering crime rates and giving children an opportunity to achieve their dreams.

FBI UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS

• Nationwide, law enforcement made an estimated 11,302,102 arrests in 2013. Of these arrest, 480,360 were for violent crimes, and 1,559,284 were for property crimes.
• The highest number of arrests were for drug abuse violations (estimated at 1,501,043 arrests), larceny-theft (estimated at 1,231,580) and driving under the influence (estimated at (1,166,824).
• Arrest of juveniles for all offenses decreased 15.5 percent in 2013 when compared with the 2012 number; arrests for adults decreased 3.7 percent.
• More than 73 percent (73.5) of the persons arrested in the nation during 2013 were males. They account for 79.9 percent of persons arrested for violent crimes and 62.2 percent of persons arrested for property crimes.
• In 2013, 68.9 percent of all persons arrested were white, 28.3 percent were black, and the remaining 2.9 percent were of other races.

RECIDIVISM RATES FOR STATES ON THE EASTERN SHORE – JUNE 2017

Delaware – Approximately 70 percent – Delaware Criminal Justice Council Statistical Center July 2013
Maryland – Approximately 40 percent – Maryland OPEN DATA PORTAL – June 2017
Virginia – Approximately 20 percent, the lowest in the United States – December 2016 VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS – PUBLIC SAFETY FIRST

In summary and as mentioned above: STOP THE REVOLVING JAILHOUSE DOOR

We hear about high crime rates and how our prisons and jails are packed. Citizens scream for more police and politicians give lip service to increased protection. But many of us have no understanding of why our crime rates are so high, the majority of which are drug-related. The recidivism rate in Delaware within three (3) years after release from prison is nearly 80 percent according to the Delaware Criminal Justice Council Statistical Analysis Center’s July 2013, 2008, and 2009, report. That means that almost 8 out of 10 released inmates return to prison within three (3) years of their release. The overwhelming majority of those released, are re-incarcerated for the same or similar crime(s).

As concerned citizens, we should be asking:

*Why are our children, parents and siblings being arrested and incarcerated, over and over again?
* Why haven’t repeat offenders been able to break the cycle of criminal activity that has prevented them from living a crime-free life?
* Why do our children have to grow up without a dad or mom because they are imprisoned?

As a society we have not learned how to forgive, focus, and provide the necessary educational, job skills training, family and medical needs to reduce the high crime and recidivism rates in this most crucial segment of our society.

WHAT DOES SUCCESS LOOK LIKE?

Within a three (3) year period, have at least one housing unit in Wicomico and Sussex Counties. Each housing unit should be of a size to accommodate 10 individuals

CRITICAL NEED

FUNDING:

When incarcerated individuals are released to society, they often possess no support group, no belongings and no place to live. Therefore, it is vital that these individuals are met at the prison gate and taken into a safe, nurturing and accountable environment that will teach them how to apply constructive principles to their life. Just as our families are designed as a primary support and means of nurturing and admonition, our communities, local, state, and federal governments, can aid in providing essential needs, such as housing, employment, transportation, life skills, educational advancement, responsibility and accountability to our society.

Funding needed to start a successful and constructive mentoring program for the incarcerated, with housing and job training being their primary needs when released will range from $250,000.00 to approximately $300.000.00, dollars annually. We will seek funding through private grants, local businesses, the community, local, state, and federal agencies, and religious organizations. IPPS’s overall goal is to establish a mentoring program in every penal institution in the State of Maryland and other interested institutions outside the state.

RESUME

Robert J. Williams, President & Executive Director
I.P.P.S. MENTORING PROGRAM INC

Business Address
PO Box 214
Delmar, DE 19940

Telephone # : 410-505-8707
Cell: 443-880-3309
E-mail: robertj.williams2@aol.com Website:

I.P.P.S. Mentoring Program Inc. is a 501 c 3 non-profit corporation, created to provide churches, community organizations and government agencies a means of developing effective mentoring programs for the incarcerated and at-risk youth in their communities. Robert J. Williams, President and Executive Director, of I.P.P.S. Mentoring Program Inc (Involved Parents Productive Students) is a native of Philadelphia, Pa., and one of twelve (12) siblings parented by James and Dorothea Williams. Mr. Williams is a retiree (2004) from the United States Department of Agriculture, Food Safety Inspection Service after 35 years of Federal service.

During his 35 years of Federal employment, Mr. Williams received numerous performance and financial awards, due to his knowledge, abilities, concerns, perseverance, and dedication in the performance of his duties. Mr. Williams started his career with the Department of Agriculture in 1968 at grade GS-5, and retired at grade GS-13. This career ladder job performance accomplishment was obtained through hard work, individual job dedication and a strong ethic to produce quality work.

Mr. Williams considers his greatest accomplishment during his 35 year tenure with the USDA, to be the creation, development, and implementation of two successful mentoring programs.

At the Department level, during the Clinton Administration Mr. Williams created and approached the Secretary of Agriculture, Mr. Dan Glickman with the idea of establishing interest a mentoring program for persons with disabilities employed within the Department of Agriculture. Secretary Glickman agreed with the need for such an innovative program and gave approval to develop and implement the mentoring initiative at the Department level.

Mr. Williams then approached the Administrator of Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS) with the idea of establishing a mentor program for employees within the agency (FSIS). Again, approval was granted and funding provided, to implement mentoring within (FSIS). Both programs (Department/Agency) were found to be highly successful towards improving employee’s job performance, promotion potential, educational desires and needs, decreasing discrimination complaints, improving diversity and providing improvement in a full range of other job performance needs, for employees and managers within the Department and the Agency.

For his mentoring efforts at the Department of Agriculture Mr. Williams received a financial rewards and a significant plaque with the following statement inscribed:
USDA MENTOR PROGRAM
For
EMPLOYEES with DISABILITIES

Mr. Robert J. Williams, Committee Chairperson

For your vision, exceptional dedication and outstanding commitment towards the Successful
Design, development and implementation of the USDA Mentor Program foe employees with disabilities.

Mr. Williams intends to continue his mentoring legacy with the I.P.P.S. Mentoring Program, Inc. His new mentoring programs are designed to enhance the lives of incarcerated individuals who are willing to make changes in their lives on Maryland’s Eastern Shore and beyond. Mentees are matched with qualified adults who have been screened and trained. The mentees are trained to work to improve each mentee’s goals in educational performance, communication skills, self-image, leadership skills, career focus and long-term success.

Education:

Mr. Williams completed high school in the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania public school system. Hired as a Food Inspector with the United States Department of Agriculture in 1968, Mr. Williams broadened his knowledge and education by participating in many USDA training programs. Mr. Williams attended Kansas State University, Mississippi State University, University of Maryland Eastern Shore, and Goddard College to further his studies in Management and Food Science. Mr. Williams obtained the title of Supervisory Food Inspector, Food Technologist Staff Officer with the United States Department of Agriculture. Mr. Williams currently resides in Wicomico County, Maryland.

I.P.P.S. Mentoring Program Inc
Officers & Board of Directors

Bryan Murfree, Director
Mr. Murfree is the Founder/CEO & President of Telewire, Inc, located in Salisbury, Maryland. Mr. Murfree is a graduate of the University of Maryland, College Park, and has been actively involved in community and church, most recently working with The Christian Shelter for the past six years. Telewire is a business network and communications company, covering the Eastern Shore of Maryland. Mr. Murfree brings his business acumen to our organization and will be working to help us meet and exceed our strategic goals and long-term vision of growth.

Catherine O. Banks, DVM, Director
Dr. Banks is a Front Line Supervisor with the US Department of Agriculture, Food Safety Inspection Service. Dr. Banks received her undergraduate degree from North Carolina Central University and Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree from Tuskegee Institute. She also graduated with her Masters in Veterinary Microbiology from Tuskegee Institute. Dr. Banks has been active in community organizations and clubs, plus volunteering in after-school children’s program with the Salvation Army.

Jane Reagan, Director
Ms. Reagan is retired, but actively involved with her church and the Wicomico County Partnership for Families and Children. She graduated from St. Catherine University in St. Paul, Minnesota, and received her Master’s degree at Colorado State University.

Joe D. Duval, Director
Mr. Duval is Retired, but actively involved within his church. Mr. Duval has had a life of working with his hands and in management in multiple capacities, learning and doing whatever was needed. From running a community water company to carpentry, cabinetry, and wooden boats. In 1986, Mr. Duval started his own residential remodeling/construction company and ran it successfully with a team of up to 34 employees. Including, architects, designers, estimators, and field construction workers.

Corinthian Thompson, Director
Mr. Thompson is a Ordained Minister. Mr. Thompson is the owner of Thompson’s Lawn Care Inc. Mr. Thompson resides in Talbot County where he received his education and provides the IPPS Mentoring Program with all Spiritual needs.

Louis Rimbach, Director
Mr. Rimbach is retired, but very active in his church. Mr. Rimbach is also actively involved with several community organization: Joseph House, Habitat for Humanity, Lend a Hand, and Camden Avenue Farmers Market. Mr. Rimbach’s career was spent in the auto industry and obtained his business degree at Baltimore University.

Stefan Antony, Director
Mr. Antony is a recent graduate from Salisbury University (2015). Mr. Antony studies at Salisbury University, double major in Accounting and Information Systems. He was born in India and immigrated to the U.S.A. at the age of eleven. He comes from a diverse background that has allowed him to become fluent in Hindi, Malayalam, and intermediate proficiency in Spanish. Stefan is very involved in the community. He serves as the President for Beta Alpha Psi, Vice-President for the Institute of Managerial Accounts and served as Business Manager for Salisbury University TV. Stefan is currently employed as a Risk Advisory Consultant with Ernst & Young LLP.

Robert J. Williams, Founder/President/Executive Director
Mr. Williams is the President and Executive Director of the IPPS Mentoring Program, Inc. having founded it in 2004, after other successful mentoring programs. Mr. Williams is currently retired as a Food Technologist/Mgr., with the US Department of Agriculture, where he was responsible for initiating mentor programs for the USDA’s disabled employees. His vision and motivation are now focus on creating the reality of a program that is geared towards closing the “revolving door of recidivism” for inmates and their families. Aside from his intense mentoring work he has been active in the American Red Cross, Partnership for Families and Children, Salisbury Area Chamber of Commerce, and PROJECT O.U.T., the implementation of a Drug Rehab. Center on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. He is a very active member of Asbury United Methodist Church serving three (3) years on the Leadership Team, active participant at the Methodist Church’s annual conferences years 2013 through 2017.

Jim Lavrich, Director
Mr. Lavrich, is a graduate of Wor Wic Community College where he obtained a HMR degree. He is a very active member of Asbury United Methodist Church as a volunteer member of the Community Shelter Emergency Team and has also served on the Asbury Church’s Leadership team. His volunteer community activities involve working with HOPE Inc., an organization that helps the homeless, and the Joseph House, an organization that feeds those in the community in need of a meal. Mr. Lavrich is presently employed with the Worcester County Health Department.

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